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View from the Cab: Waiting



By Kent Casson


The waiting game is underway as we dodge the occasional raindrops here in Central Illinois.


Even though showers are in the forecast as of this writing, it is good to know spring has finally arrived with longer days and milder temperatures. Now, we just need Mother Nature to cooperate so we can put crops in the ground.

It has felt good to get the mower out and cut grass. At least I am driving a piece of equipment. Now, if that piece of equipment was going across dirt and digging a seed trench, I’d be much happier but we can’t be picky.


The final seed has been delivered to sheds across the countryside and you can spot the occasional tractor and planter parked outside with final tune-ups underway ahead of the busy season. Cab windows are being cleaned and oil levels are being checked in anticipation of a crazy time.


Many sleepless nights are ahead as we race to put the corn and soybeans into the ground – pretty much at the same time. This was unheard of years ago but now many growers have two planters so they can get both crops going right away. In fact, they now say earlier planted beans do the best. We lose yield potential each day we sit out waiting to plant.


What shall we do? Twirl our thumbs? Nope. I’ll find plenty to do with nice weather here as our family tends to spend quite a bit of time outdoors. Calf chore season will be coming soon and we are enjoying watching Kasen run junior high track. There’s also plenty of dirt piled up in the front yard. I’ll have more on that in a future article.


These warm, breezy days mean the kids can spend endless hours outside in the fresh air. Kaislee always enjoys the swing set while the other two typically play basketball on the driveway or out in our shed. A game of baseball can’t be ruled out in the front yard either.


The forecast is showing much warmer weather moving in soon which could mean a weather window will open up for spring fieldwork. Everyone be safe out there. I will devote a future article to farm safety and what to watch out for this spring.


I especially enjoy the daylight now visible early in the morning and it will keep getting lighter sooner as the days grow longer. This is a big positive for an early morning radio guy who is typically on-air at 5 a.m. in total darkness. Pretty soon, we will see hints of the sunrise as early as 4:30 a.m.

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